Audio Recording Tips

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intrepidbiped
Posts: 5
Joined: 21 Apr 2019 06:12

Audio Recording Tips

Post by intrepidbiped » 21 Apr 2019 06:54

Hey all,
I wanted to record some new voice clips that sound like they are coming in over
the radio from HQ or from squad mates and was wondering if anyone knows if there
is a VST filter that would accomplish this effect.
If not, do you know of any other way to do this short of going out and buying a bunch of gear.
Please, any help would be greatly appreciated!
While we're at it... why not throw in any voice recording tips/tricks you are willing
to share with everyone


08.12.2007 02:08
Penguin
Trained Modder

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My voice recording tip is to hold a sheet of paper between the mic and
you if your not using a professional mic with a filter.
(Cuts out the rasping/breathing noises.)
10.12.2007 05:00
ICRage

images/avatars/avatar-1.jpg
also for recording
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Holding a piece of paper does very well also to have those unwanted
noises grab the wifes pantyhose or just buy some use a wire hanger make
a loop and stick that between that and your mic. Gives better voice
quality where as the paper works great but cuts down on the volume.
Make your audio recording.(Voice)
Get a sample of static theres tons of mp3s or whatnot for sound
effects. Maybe even make it several static types so it doesnt sound
quite the same.
Grab yourself a audio mixer. Theres tons of free and pay for out there
on the net.
Mix the two tracks together to make one track then use that track for
your level.
Not hard really. I actually bought some digital juice soundtracks a
while ago and use those effects with voice recordings and mix them
together with a free app I googled and found.
Hope this helps ya some. Im no recording guru but these methods have
worked for me with good results for video tutorials and in game voices
since I just use mine for all characters I alter my voice per character
and edit it in another app and mix to liking.
11.12.2007 00:04
MWLL|Landros

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Getting a "Radio like" effect is actually very easy if you use anything
like Adobe Audition (Cool Edit 2) or Sony Vegas. Anything that will
give you a Distortion filter and Track EQ. I like a few other filters
on top of it but the base is usually those two.
The link below was achieved by recording people over TeamSpeak and then
applying the filters above. For radio like effects, you'll want to drop
almost all of your mid-range Hz levels and increase or keep a higher
kHz range with some low end 800Hz (just a tad, not much) bass. You'll
have to play with the distortion effect to get it how you want it, but
that's the overall basics.
11.12.2007 01:06
Stringed_Evil
Polishing Weevils

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^^ good topic . awesome replies so far... won't talk technically
but more about workflow.
Lo biped, I know you're probably just wanting a few voices pumping out
through a radio for some ambiance but here's some thoughts...because
*everyone* loves sound, they just don't know it yet.
The actual sound design is important to consider here. Do you want the
radio sounds to be audible or not? If your radio messages need to give
out important mission information, they have to be clean enough to
hear. Sounds obvious but lots of guys think the more FX the better and
forget not everyone is an audiophile with super clean awesome speakers
. The stuff the player needs to hear might be lost in all the
coolness!
The informative sounds and voice acting has to be clear, words
pronounced correctly. multi-player voice commands for example, must be
clear during the combat....crysis grunt walking past with ambient radio
messages, do not. (see landros filter wmv there ^^ fantastic
ambiance, even if inaudible...lay it on thick, sounds cool)
VOICE ACTORS
Quick mic recording techniques:
1. don't speak so loud that it clips/distorts = hard to clean up
2. don't speak so quiet that the room noice (pc fans) are loud = when
you boost voice, you boost that useless room noise too! hard to clean
up
3. A good audio app will produce nice FX, better to have a clean vocal
recording than muffle your voice before it goes in.
remember : garbage in and garbage out... "you can't polish a turd!" ...
in other words, never think "oh i'll clean that up later" ...redo it on
the spot if it is poor.
Voice actors themselves can be a pain in the ass, no offense to any
voice actors reading , some have perfect recording voices, others
have to work at it. Forget FX for a minute...first consider things
like, are all the words easy to understand in the line you just heard?
I was working on a western mod voice commands this evening, and the
voice actor's line was;
"outta my way deadbeat" .. but the "T" wasn't pronounced enough, in any
of the versions he sent me. I'm sure in real life it sounded fine, but
in the game.. it sounded like "deadbee!" .. lovely. So i had to go get
a "tee" from another word and blend it in, even though it was super
quiet and a fraction of a second it made all the difference. So to sum
up, make sure your lines are clear, tell voice actors to take their
time, not to pump out 7-8 similar versions rushed. Remind them to
relax, you're the guy who has to clean it all up afterwards or take the
easy route and have messy voices and use subtitles too... *slaps*
n00o0o!
---
KEEP THE ORIGINAL HANDY
Sometimes you can't, or it's not easy to UNDO or go back a few steps
after 'processing' your sound. What if you put too many fx on for your
radio? prevention is better than cure.
If you have multi-track software a good thing to do is to have one
clean copy of your original voice playing, then duplicate it and apply
FX to the copy. Play both pan Center Then you can alter the volumes
between them both (and your layer of pure noise/static) easily and keep
the 'project' saved. Test your files in-game... if you find they could
do with less FX you can just head back to your project and alter the
volumes. export from app, import to game. Easy.
If you don't have multi-track software, and only a single audio
editor...(goldwave?) still create original and processed (FX) versions
of the line but look for a blend or MIX function in your audio app
instead.
additionally: A compressor/limiter can be used to good effect helping
squash all this audio together...also makes it easy to add TONS.. and i
meant disgusting amounts of FX without worrying about them clipping
(physical speaker distortion...too loud!)
edit: downloaded audacity... looks good! multi-track awesomeness.
you're set
1.import vocal line
2. edit ---> duplicate
3. create new audio track (so you have 3 and go generate -->white
noise)
4. go to your duplicate track and effects --> amplify ---> 20+db..use
masses!! DON'T PLAY IT BACK ..will be loud ..
6. still on duplicate track, effects ---> compressor ---> attack = 0.1,
thresh = -60db, ratio = 10:1 (these are max settings, total squash!
play around for different dynamics)
7. Play with EQ, as the lads suggested earlier...
8. mix all 3 till your happy...
A radio effect from nothing but a vocal line? you can also amplify and
compress your generated WHITE NOISE to make radio 'squelches' ..before
and after the radio is used.
__________________
Matto4 @ moddb :: Obsidian Edge 2
11.12.2007 05:41
Bandu


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I used to work as a sound engineer. The most important thing to abide
by when recording voices is to have a decent mic and mic cable. Next is
to get ahold of a pop shield. This dampens the "pops" when you voice
certain words like ,well... "pop" or "perfect" etc . If you dont have
or want to buy a pop shield you can make one out of a clothes hanger
and a pair of tights. Simply open up the hangar wire abit and stretch
the tights around the gap.The bonus here , that you dont get with a pop
shield , is you can wear the tights afterwards...if your that way
inclined .
Another tip is to record dry , eg. dont record with any effects like
reverb and dont record in a big hall or glass room. If you dont have
access to a recording booth you can dampen the room by throwing all the
pillows ,bed sheets and all other fluffy things you have into the room.
Record from the centre of the room facing the corner (so the sound
waves dont bounce straight back at you so much. Even make a makeshift
tent over yourself ,using your bedcovers , and record . You'll look
abit weird if someone walks in the room, but your recordings will be
much clearer and dryer. Add your effects afterwards.
Hold the mic 4-6inches away from your gob . Preferably dont hold
the mic at all!
Afterwards, when EQ-ing, if you want to make something abit bassier
lower the high EQ's , dont automatically go to turn up the low end
EQ's. Reducing is better than adding.
Also, if/when you come to mixing multiple audio files together and
applying effects, take frequent breaks. The reason is , listening over
an over to the same bit of audio , your ears become accustomed. If you
dont take breaks you'll tend to add way more reverb etc than is needed.
Another thing to note is as you raise volume the high end frequencies
become more pr0nounced. Mix at a medium volume. A good tip is to
frequently lower your volume so low that you can barely hear it. If you
can still hear all the parts of the mix(atleast the parts that arnt
supposed to be way back in the background), you have a good mix
Hope that helps.
Time for bed ...
PS. I forgot to mention , but compression and gate FX are pretty
important for vocals. Use them very subtley however. Compression will
compress your audio so that the vocal volume is pretty constant . Use
the Gate effect to silence the noise floor between words. Again, these
should only be used a tiny bit. They are important tho.
Its quite common to record with a touch of compression . It can help
alot if used correctly.
12.12.2007 20:32
p5ym0n
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Yes there's some excellent tips in there.
Like many who have posted, I've also been involved with audio and music
production.
I'd like to add that 'normalisation' is a technique you'll need to get
used to, especially for vocals and sounds effects. This basically means
that eveyr sound is at the same volume level.
If you are recording dialogue for some cut scenes, or voice commands,
try and get a whole sequence done in one session to avoid having to set
your system up again. Keep the same distance from the mic etc.
If some of your sounds are too quiet or loud and not adjusted correctly
in game they'll stick out like a sore thumb

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